Head in the cloud

January 23, 2009 at 1:45 pm 2 comments

In my last post I mentioned ‘cloud computing’ as the future for schools, removing the struggles with networks and other technology needs that many schools endure.

A couple of additional things about that:

Firstly a youtube video which shows what cloud computing is:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6PNuQHUiV3Q

Secondly, amongst many others, a compelling reason for schools to participate in cloud computing is because of the inevitable increase, as they implement more technology,  in unstructured data. Such things as email, instant messaging, word  processing documents, web page content, audio and video files need classification, storage and retrieval conventions and standards that are difficult to arrive at, implement and manage.

This is just another layer of technical expertise and management that serves to deflect from core activities, in the case of schools, education provision.

The more I consider this the more I believ in this inevitability of schools going the cloud computing route. If I am right about this, all those involved in technology provision in the education system from central and local government to individual schools should be taking it into account in their planning.

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Entry filed under: Cloud computing, Education, Government, Schools.

Here we go again Despair

2 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Donald Clark  |  January 23, 2009 at 3:11 pm

    You’ll be pleased to hear that Andrew Pindar, the outgpoing Chair of BECTA agrees, along with anyone with any real expertise in organisational IT. It is a catastrophic waste of money to simply implement DIY IT projects in every school, when the answer is to implement things above these institutions. This is about as obvious a proposition as one can find in IT.

    There is a reasonable argument for a LEA, especioal;ly the large ones, to implement IT services across schools,a nd I think a strong argument to outsource such work to make it even cheaper. This is what successful companies and organisations do in the real world.

    Overall, however, I think this calls for National initiatives with compulsory school participation. We could have saved millions if a service for seeting up school websites had been implemented nationally. Similarly for VLEs and a host of other services.

    Reply
  • 2. Pete Burden  |  January 27, 2009 at 3:37 pm

    Interesting – as an outsider I’d be interested to know what prevents making programmes like this compulsory. It seems a good idea if you are going to realise the most benefits.

    (PS Hi Donald, long time no see).

    Reply

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Mick Landmann on education, digital technology, and the 21st century

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